Auction Sale

Today, I made my first purchase at an auction.  I have been to auctions before; and I have been an unsuccessful bidder before.  This time, I made a purchase.  I didn’t win it; I bought it.  This computer-based auction idea of ‘winning’ something is ridiculous.  How is being willing to pay more than anyone else winning?

I digress.

Last night, I had been to the viewing.  (That sounds a bit funereal; but you know what I mean.)  The reason for my being there was a Browning T-bolt .22 which had caught my eye on the advertisement.  The rifling in its barrel didn’t quite catch my eye; in fact, there was a definite smoothness.

As I was there anyway, I had a look around the rest of the sale items.  I found a history book for the area where my Wife’s Father’s people had settled.  They were mentioned in it.  I found a very nice blue china ginger jar.  And, I found a fair sized Willow patterned platter.

Someone else got the book.  I went to my limit on the ginger jar only to hear another $5 going on the price.  I was good; it is gone.

The platter was sold in a lot of three.  The method was that the highest bidder could buy any or all of the platters for that price each.  Well, the bids quickly left me behind.  However, the highest bidder wanted one of the other platters, not the Willow.  So, the bids started again for the remaining two as one lot comprised of both remaining platters.  I got them for $40 plus tax.

When I got them home, we looked up the markings.  I knew that the Willow platter was English and of hanging on the wall grade.  Our search revealed that it was made by William A. Adderley & Co. of Daisy Bank Pottery, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, between the years 1886 and 1905.

The other smaller platter has an off-white background and a brown pattern of rosehips, a scroll, and a pair of curlews.  It was made by G. L. Ashworth and Brothers, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, between the years 1862 and 1890.  The pattern is called Melrose.

I am quite pleased with my purchases.  I shall be satisfied when I have found something with which to hang them on the wall.  The Willow will go above and to the left of Wife’s desk in the corner of the dining room.  The rustic charm of the other says, um, mudroom.

About Tweed and Briar

I am the pastor of a rather conservative rural congregation. My interests alongside of work are hunting, fly fishing, cooking, and life in an agricultural community. By way of family, I have a wife and two children: a daughter and a son. I am of indeterminate age because my wife is a bit younger than I am and my son is ages with some of my friends’ grandchildren. However, to say that I slip smoothly among the generations would imply an agility which I no longer possess. I aspire to the genteel poverty of the country manse.
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6 Responses to Auction Sale

  1. I like the brown one! But admittedly can’t think of where to hang it. If we had a nice mudroom….and didn’t have to take down one of your pictures to put it up…the trouble with antiques is finding place to display them.

  2. “… the trouble with antiques is finding place to display them.” Now I know what you are thinking when you look at me.

  3. Edith says:

    Rofl at the comments. Interesting post. Too bad on the book though – I would have found that interesting. I gather smooth rifle barrels are not good?

  4. Oh dear. The sound that you are hearing in your head is probably the Grandpa Baker gene tumbling down the helix of your DNA.

  5. Pingback: Beaufort Minor | Tweed and Briar

  6. Pingback: Blue & White China: Willow and Spode | Tweed and Briar

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