Land Rovers From The Grave

I met someone on the internet and my Wife is worried.

Now, the link that another friend sent me last night would not bother her in the slightest.  It is to a 1966 Land Rover Series IIa 109 on sale for $15,000.  She would simply repeat the words she uses on all such occasions: Dream On.

However, the man on the internet rebuilds and restores Land Rovers.  And, there is yet another man who lives a couple of towns to the east of us who has two much neglected, if not abandoned, Series IIa 109s for sale at a much lower price.  (There are photographs here, but I do not know for how long.)  These, I could afford.  Yet, were I to speak of projects, there is the ‘honey do’ list.  If of hobbies, there are huntin’ and fishin’.  An investment?  There would be peals of laughter.  Building one working Land Rover out of the two would probably be the financial equivalent of having another teen living with us, eating us out of what the preexisting Teen and Preteen kindly leave of house and home.

Och, She’s probably not worried at all.  It would be nice, though, if She were: just a wee bit.

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About Tweed and Briar

I am the pastor of a rather conservative rural congregation. My interests alongside of work are hunting, fly fishing, cooking, and life in an agricultural community. By way of family, I have a wife and two children: a daughter and a son. I am of indeterminate age because my wife is a bit younger than I am and my son is ages with some of my friends’ grandchildren. However, to say that I slip smoothly among the generations would imply an agility which I no longer possess. I aspire to the genteel poverty of the country manse.
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6 Responses to Land Rovers From The Grave

  1. mud4fun says:

    Oh poor Land Rovers, they need saving!

    There is even a very rare Series 1 in those for sale, it is a hard top version. Sadly all of those vehicles will need almost complete rebuilds and probably new chassis. Not a thing to be undertaken lightly as even here in the UK where Land Rover parts are common and relatively easy to find. To restore a 109″ to good usable condition for daily use would be in the region of £5000 (USD 8000) in the UK and for you guys over there it would probably be double that having spoken to a few people in the States.

    My wifes Series 3 109″ has cost £8000 in total (including buying the vehicle) to rebuild and is used daily, does 4-6K miles a year and is very reliable. My Series 2 88″ is now nearing completion of a 3 year rebuild which is bringing her back to better than new condition and that has cost approx £7K so far with a further £3K required to complete the build. She’ll be doing some 20K miles a year so is being built to be as quick, comfortable and reliable as is possible to make an old Series truck.

    These sound like huge sums of money but in reality our trucks will have cost less then even the cheapest small family car available in the UK and massively less than a new SUV and their annual running costs are far less as tax, insurance and maintenance are a fraction of a modern cars.

    I recommend you buy your wife a Series Land Rover so she’ll fall under their spell and then she’ll be more ameniable to you restoring one for yourself (Yes, I know your wife will read this 😉 ) She is more than welcome to speak to my wife who now loves her 109″ and has become a real Series Land Rover fan. You can always point out the added bonus to her that she’ll get lots of attention from strange men in supermarket car parks 🙂

    Seriously though, old Land Rovers, like most classic cars are money pits. You need a deep wallet and need to be prepared to do most of the work yourself and you need a very large workshop with a nice flat concrete floor and heating. Once they are rebuilt to a very good standard however they become as reliable and usable as any modern day 4×4 unlike most classic cars.

  2. I’m trying to picture myself driving an old Land Rover at 60…

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